A selection of microphones Vol I.

This is a list of commonly used microphones in a studio environment and their brief description.

I am studying audio and this might be useful for some with similar interest. If you know your beans and spot an error, please leave comment

  • SE 2200 II
  • SE-2A
  • AKG C1000
  • AKG C451 B
  • AKG C414 XLS
  • Cascade Fat Head II-SP
  • SE Z5600a II
SE 2200 II

Microphone: SE 2200 II – Condenser microphone – large diaphragm
What for: Vocals, Voice overs, Instrumental recording (acoustic guitar, piano, etc)
Where to put it: Placed in the factory supplied isolation pack with pop filter (plus shielding if preferred) for vocal recordings / about 4-5 inches from instrument (no pop filter) is recording something like an acoustic guitar.
Why you want it: Large diaphragm condensing, cardioid or multi-pattern microphone (depending on the version). The cardioid version is great in small home studios or places where other acoustics is poor (mic rejects sounds from the rear). The mic sensitivity makes it an ideal choice for studio vocals and recording acoustic instruments in a studio environment.

SE2A

Microphone: SE-2A – Condenser microphone – Small diaphragm
Use: All rounder mic for acoustic instruments in a studio environment, also being used as drum overheads or for choral recordings.
Placement: 3-5 inches from instrument, 10-15 inches as drum overhead
Why you want it: small diaphragm condenser mic, high SPL (sound pressure level), but average Equivalent Noise Level (in terms of sensitivity). This would be an ideal instrument microphone with many purposes (except kick drums)

Microphone: AKG C1000 – Condenser microphone – Small diaphragm
Use: Versatile mic, great for recording bass cabinets, drum hats
Placement: approx an inch from the middle of the best sounding speaker cones for bass. About 2-3 inch from hats
Why you want it: Cardioid polar pattern (does not pick up sound from the back), -10db attenuator (more protected from overload damage) and an 80Hz bass cut filter (to counter proximity effect)


AKG C451 B

Microphone: AKG C451 B – Condenser microphone – Small diaphragm
Use: Recording drums, acoustic guitar, strings, stereo overheads
Placement: approx an inch from the middle of the best sounding speaker cones for bass. About 2-3 inch from hats, “a guitar length” away for acoustic guitar
Why you want it: Cardioid polar pattern, flat frequency response, can be pair-matched, capable to accurately reproducing transients of percussive instruments. Optional attenuator pad (-10db/-20db) for recording loud stuff.



AKG C414 XLS

Microphone: AKG C414 XLS – Condenser microphones Stereo Set – Large diaphragm
Use: Excellent for vocal recordings in a stereo set.
Placement: Placed in stereo set up at front of the vocalist / choir
Why you want it: Multi-pattern with Optional attenuator pads (-6/-12/-18db), sensitive, rounded down low frequency response

Microphone: Cascade Fat Head II-SP – Ribbon microphones Stereo Set
Use: Blumlein stereo recording technique, overheads, ambient
Placement: For Blumlein: placed 90 degree to each other with capsules as close as possible. For ambient and regular overhead: place it to taste…
Why you want it: Able to pick up high frequency details, bidirectional pick up pattern, wide frequency response, highly sensitive.

Microphone: SE Z5600a II – Tube microphone
Use: Room ambience, close guitar (acoustic) guitar recording, maybe vocals
Placement: 2 inches from sound source (for instrument), appropriate placement for room ambience, depending on target.
Why you want it: Multi-pattern sensitive condenser mic, using old school vacuum tubes instead of solid state relays. Optional -10db pad. Warm sound, with a bit of charming distortion Also it is my favourite of all beside of the Cascade ribbon (from a technical anorak point of view)

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